If you’re wondering what mindfulness is really about

Mindfulness is really about love. Love and creativity. I know these are foolish, simple words for me to say these days, but sometimes it’s the oldest, most overused picture book in the library that speaks the truth, generation after generation.

When we choose the practice of mindfulness coupled with a daily, contemplative discipline like meditation, we are cultivating our capacity to love. Mindfulness is love in action, so to speak. Learning to love yourself and love others. It is really very simple.

The three essential components of mindfulness are Time, Space and Energy. Mindfulness education is about learning the function and interrelationship between each of these three alchemies.

Time. When we give anything in life a regular dose of sanctioned time, we communicate value, concern, and care. We spend time with those we love, we spend time with our life’s work. The amount of time we give or receive radically transforms our perspective. Over time we grow old and wise. When we are present, time is eternity.

Space. When we provide ample space for something unknown to exist, we are opening the door of possibility. When we are full or constrained whether it be physically or in thought, there is no room for novelty and expansion. When we declutter the space, starting with our mind, we are inviting the whole world in.

Energy. Life requires energy. We learn to metabolize energy wisely in order to survive. Choosing a natural source of energy is best, because it does not cause harm to others or the planet. Through sustained focus and understanding the field of energy vibrations that connect us to the earth and each other, we increase our potential.

Mindfulness is about putting these natural components to work for us. It is a very equitable practice because we are all equipped! We can observe how this formula is applied in life situations and in nature. We can apply these elements to how we design learning for children. We can give the gift of time to our students. We can create space by sitting in silence. We can guide children to become aware of energy and point out how we often communicate with each other without saying anything.

In mindfulness programs in education, we don’t often hear that we are learning how to put love into action. We’ve been socialized to believe that love is too subjective, immaterial, and non-academic. Do we really need love to teach and learn mathematics? Do we need love to succeed ? Yet, when we look past all the mystery, we see that in every exceptional school, in every exceptional family, love is put into action. Love for oneself,  love for others, love for the planet. How we take care of ourselves, and each other and how we use knowledge to make sure our world is healthy, happy and sustainable is central to everything!

A teacher says “I love my students.” What is she saying exactly? Do we question her integrity? Do we think she is lacking in judgment and right selectivity? Perhaps love has made her biased and now she cannot assess her students accurately. These are all important questions.

Mindfulness can be a self serving, egotistical practice when we get absorbed in it. It is possible to lose clarity and balance, even when we are feeling “the love.” This is all part of the human condition and the universe is very clever! So, yes, we must be careful and vigilant about our mindfulness practice. We need to question what we are doing, for whom and how our actions demonstrate love in action. We must remain innocent and open to feedback.

I recommend that we make a commitment to a guided contemplative practice, such as meditation.  Apply the discipline of silent reflection regularly to your life and allow your  mindfulness practice in education to evolve and grow with your own awareness. Share your practice with others so that you can see yourself through someone else’s eyes. That is why we need each other, so we can see our world as one whole.

We can lead our mindfulness work with this understanding– that mindfulness is about love and creativity. Sometimes foolish, simple words are what we need.

love

 

 

 

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